Issues when writing about sportswomen on Wikipedia

Recently, I read a piece of research about coverage of Spanish Paralympic athletes, and it said that for the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Paralympic Games, the relative amount of coverage in the media for male versus female athletes was pretty even. The difference the study found was that the articles about male athletes were much more likely to have a picture of the male in action, while women were not shown as sportspeople. At the same time, it found that female athletes were much more likely to be given a personal, non-sport narrative to frame their competitive nature. The focus on male athletes was much more likely to be on their performances.

And you know, when writing sources for articles in a few of the less popular sports (not swimming or athletics), this appears to really be the case. :/ Hence, the Wikipedia article gets a lot more background on these women as people. Not sure how good this is in a broader context because some research suggests that highlighting women not as sportspeople while doing the opposite for men just reinforces traditional gender stereotypes, and fails to normalize the idea that women should be playing competitive sport. Thus, it ends up limiting opportunities for women. How do people deal with these issues when editing?

Is there a way as a journalist for Wikinews I can change this?

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Ready For a (Virtual) League of Our Own

This is an absolutely awesome post about some of the underlying issues dealing with sexism in soccer that are not being discussed.

SoshiTech - Soshitech.com

From FIFA to NBA 2K — women are largely absent from sports video games

 

In 1999, the Women’s World Cup took the world by storm. Brandi Chastain scored the winning penalty kick against China and made covers of pretty much every major publication — sports or otherwise. The victory confirmed what many of us teenage soccer players had suspected — we wanted to play on the national team. But of course, the vast majority of us never actually get that far. Instead, we go on to do things like journalism or accounting or computer science or design. And that’s fine. Most men who wanted to play soccer stopped, too. But for them, at least, there’s a place where they can continue the fantasy: video games. Boot up FIFA, run around as Ronaldo for a bit, get those old passions burning. For us, though, nothing. Chastain isn’t in FIFA. In…

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Wikinews writing: A personal year in review

Since I started writing Wikinews last year, I’ve had published 226 articles.  This year, these articles combined had about 558,000 total views.  Including articles from last year, the top ten most popular articles I wrote this year were:

  1. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 25,875 views
  2. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 19,728 views
  3. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 15,792 views
  4. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development credits Icelandic parental policy with ‘hopeful’ changes – 15,641 views
  5. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development looks at women’s issues in India – 15,379 views
  6. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 9,518 views
  7. Russian government homosexuality position leads to NYC Russian vodka boycott – 8,598 views
  8. Icelandic Hekla volcano shows signs of activity – 8,284 views
  9. Quakes push Canary Islands up eleven centimetres – 8,041 views
  10. IOC visits Madrid as part of 2020 Olympic bid process – 7,633 views

Many of these articles were written this year. Some, including the most popular, were written last year.  They represent a wide variety of topics, and types of reporting including original reporting, interviews and synthesis reporting.  Some articles are featured and a few are short articles.

In January, my most popular articles were:

  1. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 5,488 views
  2. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 4,350 views
  3. Real Madrid defeats Celta Vigo 4-0 in Copa del Rey octofinals – 1,756 views
  4. Australia earns one medal on day three of 2012 IPC Nor-Am Cup – 1,680 views
  5. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 1,658 views
  6. Abby Wambach wins FIFA World Player of the Year – 1,606 views
  7. Australia women’s water polo team into FINA Women’s World League Super Finals quarter finals – 1,407 views
  8. Australian Broadcasting Corporation plans to call California for Obama before polls close – 1,115 views
  9. Canberra Capitals beat Chinese women’s national B basketball team in pre-season – 1,010 views
  10. Wikinews interviews United States disability skier Jasmin Bambur – 988 views

A number of these articles were carry overs from 2012. For February, you can see I’ve clearly been in Spain doing original reporting and some of this is reflected in the popular articles this month. I went to a Real Madrid game, interviewed Teresa Perales, and covered the IPC Alpine World Championships. I also wrote about Madrid’s Olympic and Paralympic bid.

  1. Gambling sites favor Cardinals Marc Ouellet, Peter Turkson, Francis Arinze as next Pope – 3,973 views
  2. Reports of at least fourteen dead this week due to gun-related suicides in the United States – 3,647 views
  3. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 3,646 views
  4. Pope Benedict XVI resigns effective February 28 – 3,029 views
  5. 2013 IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships preparations underway – 1,678 views
  6. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 1,406 views
  7. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 1,125 views
  8. Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships – 976 views
  9. Real Madrid defeats Sevilla 4-1 in La Liga play – 972 views
  10. Wikinews interviews Irene Villa – 955 views

In March, I returned to Spain but some of the articles written in February continued to get views. I wrote again about Australia.

  1. Icelandic Hekla volcano shows signs of activity – 5,402 views
  2. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 2,632 views
  3. Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships – 2,594 views
  4. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 2,281 views
  5. Kiribati acquires international funding for solar power – 1,781 views
  6. New Zealand’s Adam Hall and Corey Peters finish run at 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships – 1,753 views
  7. Nathalie Carpanedo finishes wild card run at 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships – 1,424 views
  8. Austria wins friendly team competition at end of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships – 1,416 views
  9. France finishes 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships on top of medal ladder – 1,394 views
  10. Stolen Utahraptor recovered in Australian Capital Territory – 1,390 views

For April, 4 out of the 10 most popular articles were written before April. I was again writing Australian related topics.

  1. Quakes push Canary Islands up eleven centimetres – 5,674 views
  2. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 3,284 views
  3. Interview: University of Guam’s Ron McNinch on North Korea’s nuclear threats – 3,226 views
  4. Two unconscious drug-overdosed men discovered outside University of Canberra residence hall – 2,520 views
  5. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,985 views
  6. Wikinews interviews USA wheelchair curler David Palmer – 1,423 views
  7. Brookfield, Wisconsin man charged with stealing toilet and urinal parts – 1,120 views
  8. Kiribati acquires international funding for solar power – 1,057 views
  9. As Italy prepares for new government, shots fired near prime minister’s office – 983 views
  10. Chicago Bears select Marquess Wilson in seventh round of NFL draft – 914 views

In May, only one of my most popular articles were written this month. To be fair, I do not produce ten articles every month. I produced seven in December. 4 in November, 9 in October, 9 in September, 6 in August, 6 in July, 0 in June, 1 in May, 7 in April, 12 in March, 17 in February, and 4 in February.

  1. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 3,031 views
  2. Miles Franklin Literary Award nominates only women for potential winners – 2,573 views
  3. Australian Jesse Williams drafted in fifth round by the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks – 1,941 views
  4. Report finds Canberra and Northern Territory have most expensive cocaine in Australia – 1,660 views
  5. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 1,558 views
  6. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,471 views
  7. As Italy prepares for new government, shots fired near prime minister’s office – 1,351 views
  8. Chicago Bears select Marquess Wilson in seventh round of NFL draft – 877 views
  9. Kiribati acquires international funding for solar power – 860 views
  10. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 854 views

With no production in June, my total article views dropped. This month I was busy moving from Australia to Spain, so I had less time to dedicate to Wikinews than I would have liked.

  1. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 2,040 views
  2. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 1,783 views
  3. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 1,634 views
  4. Report finds Canberra and Northern Territory have most expensive cocaine in Australia – 1,017 views
  5. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 917 views
  6. IOC visits Madrid as part of 2020 Olympic bid process – 766 views
  7. Wikinews interviews Irene Villa – 744 views
  8. Kiribati acquires international funding for solar power – 614 views
  9. Miles Franklin Literary Award nominates only women for potential winners – 593 views
  10. Wikinews interviews USA wheelchair curler David Palmer – 591 views

My production was up a bit in July. I formally began my involvement with the Spanish Paralympic Committee. This is reflected in popular articles this month.

  1. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 1,851 views
  2. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,771 views
  3. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete Gustavo Nieves Campello – 1,265 views
  4. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete Elena Congost Mohedano – 1,043 views
  5. San Fermín de los Navarros church in Madrid celebrates patron day – 978 views
  6. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 939 views
  7. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete David Casinos – 903 views
  8. Catholic Democrats tell Chicago Cardinal George not to pull funding from immigration campaigners supporting same-sex marriage – 840 views
  9. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete Alberto Suárez Laso – 700 views
  10. Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales – 691 views

In August, I continued to interview Spanish Paralympians and there was an audience for this content.

  1. Russian government homosexuality position leads to NYC Russian vodka boycott – 3,666 views
  2. Peter Capaldi named twelfth Doctor Who – 1,927 views
  3. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font – 1,919 views
  4. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 1,917 views
  5. Illinois high schools now required to buy insurance for athletes – 1,786 views
  6. Catholic Democrats tell Chicago Cardinal George not to pull funding from immigration campaigners supporting same-sex marriage – 1,590 views
  7. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,434 views
  8. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez – 1,288 views
  9. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer María Delgado – 1,253 views
  10. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 1,011 views

Late August and September and I wrote more about gender equality issues. This is reflected in page views.

  1. Russian government homosexuality position leads to NYC Russian vodka boycott – 3,666 views
  2. Peter Capaldi named twelfth Doctor Who – 1,927 views
  3. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font – 1,919 views
  4. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 1,917 views
  5. Illinois high schools now required to buy insurance for athletes – 1,786 views
  6. Catholic Democrats tell Chicago Cardinal George not to pull funding from immigration campaigners supporting same-sex marriage – 1,590 views
  7. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,434 views
  8. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez – 1,288 views
  9. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer María Delgado – 1,253 views
  10. Three cities submit bids for 2020 Summer Olympics – 1,011 views

In September and October, I was interested in data mining. A lot of this was focused on CFPB numbers, and these articles got a fair number of views.

  1. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development credits Icelandic parental policy with ‘hopeful’ changes – 5,654 views
  2. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development looks at women’s issues in India – 5,330 views
  3. Bank of America leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about mortgages – 3,695 views
  4. Sallie Mae leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about student loans – 3,161 views
  5. Canberra central business district trials urinals – 2,484 views
  6. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development suggests Australian women are doing okay – 2,015 views
  7. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete David Casinos – 1,957 views
  8. Australia has mixed OECD rankings for literacy and numeracy amongst adults – 1,773 views
  9. CFPB records fewer complaints in early days of US government shutdown – 1,695 views
  10. Spain sits near the bottom of OECD rankings on adult literacy and numeracy – 1,532 views

In November, there continued to be a fair amount of interest in the articles about gender equality, even though new content was produced by me.

  1. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development credits Icelandic parental policy with ‘hopeful’ changes – 4,878 views
  2. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development looks at women’s issues in India – 4,854 views
  3. Bangladesh government makes Hijra an official gender option – 4,546 views
  4. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete David Casinos – 2,032 views
  5. US Congresswoman Jackie Speier comments about Obamacare, Paralympics – 1,970 views
  6. US Marines change hat style in response to manufacturer’s closure – 1,774 views
  7. ONCE defeats Getafe 86-36 in Spain’s top level wheelchair basketball league – 1,564 views
  8. Wikinews interviews academic Simon Ličen about attitudes towards US Paralympics – 1,462 views
  9. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,382 views
  10. Bank of America leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about mortgages – 1,084 views

With the month mostly over, though still having a week left, most of the articles are popular for this month. There are a few articles not in the top of the list for the month. Given enough time, they may crack the list.

  1. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development credits Icelandic parental policy with ‘hopeful’ changes – 3,682 views
  2. 2012 Report on Gender Equality and Development looks at women’s issues in India – 3,676 views
  3. New Zealand study finds correlation between church attendance and adolescent obesity – 3,162 views
  4. Bangladesh government makes Hijra an official gender option – 2,397 views
  5. Pickens County, South Carolina sheriff refuses to lower US flag to honor Mandela – 2,116 views
  6. Sepp Blatter pick for FIFA World Cup draw presenter labelled as sexist – 1,819 views
  7. Wikinews interviews academic Steve Redhead about Australian women’s soccer – 1,641 views
  8. Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic track and field athlete David Casinos – 1,484 views
  9. FanFiction.Net adult content purge felt across fandom two weeks on – 1,288 views
  10. Wikinews interviews former Matilda’s player Sarah Walsh about Australian women’s soccer – 1,270 views

And just to end on a different note, the ten most popular articles published on English Wikinews includes a number of editors who were new or write few articles. There is original reporting and other types of reporting.

  1. Haitian cholera victims threaten United Nations with lawsuit – 29,228 views
  2. Mandela discharged from hospital – 28,346 views
  3. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher dies aged 87 – 27,427 views
  4. Study: Taste of beer causes chemical reward in male brain – 24,289 views
  5. Ninth World Games open in Santiago de Cali, Colombia – 24,169 views
  6. Healthcare workers, public officials struggle to address influenza outbreak across much of U.S. – 23,970 views
  7. Record size 17.4 million-digit prime found – 23,569 views
  8. First successful womb transplant recipient passes six-week pregnancy mark – 23,508 views
  9. Two people confirmed dead in Boston Marathon bombing – 22,385 views
  10. Researchers create rat kidneys in a laboratory – 20,428 views

When interviews don’t work out

There has been a number of articles recently about sexism in women’s sports and for female sport journalists in the past year.  I sent inquiries/requests to about 20 sport reporters to answer questions related to this topic for a possible year end interview.  I got back two responses, one of which was single word answers to questions that were NOT single word answer type questions.  So I have two responses, neither of which are long enough to actually write an actual article.  

The value of editing Wikipedia articles about the men’s FIFA World Cup teams

First, preface: I am not interested in commercializing Wikipedia.  I believe in an advertisement-free Wikipedia, Wikinews and Commons.  The funding model to support this works, and there is inherent benefit provided that would change this.

I like economic data and thinking about the monetary value of things as it can be used to assist in framing ideas and understanding priorities where other metrics might not.  I originally wanted to write this as a Wikinews article, but unfortunately for me, there is no research offering a clear methodological approach for duplicating existing academic research that would allow for a journalism based approach to allowing the relative ranking of English Wikipedia articles based on the value of individual edits.  See failed article and failed review at Cristiano Ronaldo tops Neymar and Messi on most valuable Wikipedia edits and Talk:Cristiano Ronaldo tops Neymar and Messi on most valuable Wikipedia edits‎.  I’m just inherently unable to do what is required, so I decided to switch to my blog.

Before going into any depth, let me start by saying the monetary and economic value of Wikipedia is not easily defined.  It all depends on how you define it.  There is little discussion of this in any practical sense that can allow for monetary weight of edits.  Indeed, even as the Wikimedia Foundation (WMF) makes a bigger push for definitions of success for chapters, itself, user groups and a thematic organization, the WMF has not provided any research as to the value of edits.  Academics haven’t stepped in to fill this void.  If marketers are doing it, they aren’t making it public.  In fact, I think if they have done, they would probably be hiding it because my suspicion is the perceived economic value of Wikipedia by certain segments keen to monetize it is higher than most astute and knowledgeable marketers would put it at.

What is the monetary value of Wikipedia?  Jonathan Band and Jonathan Gerafi (“Wikipedia’s Economic Value” — Infojustice) put the value of all Wikipedia projects at US$6.6 billion, with updating costs of $630 million per year. Siteprice.org, one of several online automated tools that allows you to estimate the value of your site, puts the value of English Wikipedia at $573,552,771. Mywebsiteworth.com puts the value of English Wikipedia at $ 166,666,667.  Evaluateanywebsite.com puts the value at $486,139,770. Webuka.com puts the value at US$2 billion.   The range is pretty huge with the low end of $166 million and the high end at $6.6 billion.

Wikipedia isn’t a static website.  Pages do not get uniform page views, nor do they have uniform editing patterns.  Some pages, for their visibility, are inherently worth more.  The page titled Climatic Research Unit email controversy has had 7.9 million page views in the past 30 days.  Meanwhile, the article about Ruth Glick had 185.

From a general priority viewpoint, while fully acknowledging the project is based on volunteer contributions in terms of time and priorities and while acknowledging systemic bias in traffic patterns,  focusing on improving articles with high page views seems to be the best strategy.  Again, there is no academic, marketing based or WMF provided formula which suggests what type of edits improve editing content.  There is at times an idea that the more editors involved with an article, the higher quality it will be… or at least, the fewer glaring wrong factual errors it will have.

So focusing back on the total edits and suggesting editing priorities in terms of the men’s FIFA World Cup on Wikipedia. In the past 30 days, Brazil, Germany, England, Portugal, Spain ranked as the top 5.  In terms of a views, that’s 164878 for Brazil, 151817 for Germany, 133590 for England, 124414 for Portugal,  and 122249 for Spain.  Lots of views, but not close to Cristiano Ronaldo at 689777, Lionel Messi at 493801 and Neymar at 243890.  Heck, close but not quite on par with Manchester United F.C. at  201916 or Real Madrid C.F. at 166304.  The numbers for the particular national teams will almost certainly repeatedly speak and gain a certain overall higher average daily plateau during the World Cup itself: this was the pattern at the Olympic Games and to a lesser degree the Rugby World Cup.  Wikipedia traffic to these articles won’t be critically important though as a source of information.  The mainstream media can and will trump Wikipedia in terms of overall page views for this topic because the mainstream media has an economic incentive to drive traffic to their sites for this topic.  It is a big event, with an audience of potentially billions.  These sites are updating frequently.   If there is a fight for that audience during the World Cup, individual player profiles should probably be prioritized first, their club profiles second, national teams third.  Views and use are often seen as indicators of potential success because the goal is to monetize that.  Or at least have the potential to monetize that audience.

What’s all this Wikipedia traffic worth?  (Which is important to know if we’re trying to figure out the value of Wikipedia edits.) We know it has monetary value because we know others are trying to generate traffic based on the World Cup. We also know that search and social media play a huge role in Wikipedia traffic acquisition. This can be verified looking at those sites that valued Wikipedia.  Two sources of publicly measurable data sources for views for these clicks come from Facebook Ads and Google Adwords.

Yesterday and today, I’ve gone to Facebook and Google Adwords and gotten the cost-per-click value associated with keywords for a USA audience to determine what it would cost to buy all these visits.  Not 100% realistic in the case of Google Adwords because the search data shows that the volume of searches doesn’t match with the traffic of these articles, but Google AdWords is one of the best methods we have. Using this metric, Cristiano Ronaldo is worth $510,434.98 on Facebook and  $9,449.94 on Google AdWords.   If we average the two numbers together, Ronaldo traffic to the Ronaldo article is worth $259,942.46.  That’s behind only the 2014 FIFA World Cup article at $454,518.76.  The most valuable player on my list is Ronaldo.  Wayne Rooney is second with $219,113.69. Messi is third at $174,015.47. The first men’s national team that appears on the list $107,493.55.  Next comes Germany at $104,457.69, Brazil at  $88,811.53 and Belgium at $87,482.26.  The top women’s team of the selected teams on the list is the US women at $16,169.37, directly ahead of the Australian men at  $16,046.96 , Landon Donavon at $14,736.40, the Ivory Coast men at $13,351.22 and Russia’s men at $11,292.52.  The Russian men are the worst valued team in terms of Wikipedia article views value of all 2014 World Cup team.

And this is where we have to make a logical jump.  Wikipedia editing is not the same as other website contributions.  Many sites pay $15 to $50 for original blog posts.  Some of them pay flat rates plus extra based on traffic.  Many of these sites are not sport websites, though a few are.  It isn’t particularly possible to say “An article about the US men’s national team will pay $50, while an article about fellow group team Germany is worth $25.”  And then from there, multiple and divide out and divine an answer for the question of how much value an article has.  The metrics just are not available. And again, we don’t have a formula to assign value to individual Wikipedia edits, or to assign monetary value to edits.

So the formula I’ve devised is to take the total number of edits to the article, 10392 for the Ronaldo article as of yesterday, divide that number by the total number of page views to the article in the past 30 days.   In Ronaldo’s case that is 689777.   For his article, there are 66 views for every edit.  Yeah, a number of these edits are probably crap and vandalism.  Some probably were very good in terms of adding information and adding extra bytes.  Absent any meaningful way to separate these out, we’re forced to use that 66 number.  So then we take that number and we multiply it by the average Facebook cost-per-click which is $0.74 and the Google AdWords suggested bid which is $0.01. Facebook value per edit is $48.79 and Google AdWords is $0.90.  Average between the two is $24.85.   It isn’t perfect, but it reflects the different pricing between Facebook and AdWords.

Using this formula, the most valuable 2014 World Cup team based on a per edit basis is the Belgium team article at $33.44.  It has comparatively high Facebook and AdWords value at $0.65 and $0.95.   The ratio of edits to views is also high at 42.  Switzerland, ranked second amongst all teams with a value of $18.91, has a much lower ratio at 24. Only 2014 FIFA World Cup, Neymar, Cristiano Ronaldo, FIFA Ballon d’Or and Lionel Messi have higher ratios than Belgium.   Looking at the bottom, there is England national football team, Iran national football team, Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team, France women’s national football team, Mexico national football team, Australia national association football team and Argentina women’s national football team. All have a views to edit ratio of less than 10.  This monetary value should have some meaning because neither the views, total edits, nor monetary value actually correlate to article quality. The quality is pretty uniformly poor across all articles in this sample, with the exception of Germany women, where the article is a Featured Article and one or two of the player biographies which are legitimate Bs, which means they are relatively complete and almost fully referenced.

So herein lies the value of a Wikipedia edit.  It is independent of article quality.  The formula values market preferences for certain keywords more than others, ranging from $0.00 to $2.37 on AdWords and $0.58 to $0.74 on Facebook.  Edits are more valuable when there are fewer in relation to the audience because more edits isn’t related to article quality, completeness or up-to-date-ness.  This matters because you can understand two measures of external audience interest and the relative value they place on the article’s importance, with article text being supported by edits to it.  Ideally, you probably want to be in the middle of the pack like Manchester United F.C., Ecuador national football team, Franck Ribéry, Ivory Coast national football team and United States men’s national soccer team are.  They have middle of the range edits to views ratio, no huge skew on the Facebook or AdWords value, Edit totals in the 4 digits.  View totals in the 5.

But if you want to know where content creators did relatively less work for relatively large number of page views, where Facebook and AdWords think these topics are worth money, then the complete list of all the articles in the sample is below.

Article Value per Wikipedia edit
2014 FIFA World Cup $103.41
Belgium national football team $33.44
Neymar $32.42
Wayne Rooney $30.30
Cristiano Ronaldo $24.85
Switzerland national football team $18.91
FIFA Ballon d’Or $18.03
Cameroon national football team $17.48
Uruguay national football team $17.41
Association football $16.90
Lionel Messi $15.81
Colombia national football team $14.89
Jurgen Klinsmann $14.60
Germany national football team $14.52
Argentina national football team $12.70
Andrés Iniesta $11.87
Nigeria national football team $11.11
Portugal national football team $10.99
Spain national football team $10.64
Netherlands national football team $9.66
Brazil national football team $9.23
Estádio do Maracanã $9.19
Italy national football team $9.13
Abby Wambach $9.11
Ghana national football team $9.00
Croatia national football team $8.90
France national football team $8.15
Manchester United F.C. $7.85
Ecuador national football team $7.42
Franck Ribéry $7.23
Ivory Coast national football team $6.70
United States men’s national soccer team $6.42
Real Madrid C.F. $6.41
FC Barcelona $6.23
Vicente del Bosque $5.94
United States women’s national soccer team $5.93
Honduras national football team $5.71
Costa Rica national football team $5.56
Ballon d’Or (1956–2009) $5.01
Algeria national football team $4.67
South Korea national football team $4.49
Marta (footballer) $4.43
Germany women’s national football team $4.38
Australia women’s national association football team $4.04
Russia national football team $3.99
Japan national football team $3.85
Landon Donovan $3.69
Mia Hamm $3.64
Nigeria women’s national football team $3.38
England national football team $3.33
Iran national football team $3.21
Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team $3.18
France national women’s football team $3.15
Mexico national football team $2.62
Australia national association football team $1.99
Argentina women’s national football team $1.45
Semen Padang F.C. $1.14

Where Wikipedia entrenches bias against women…

The move discussion about the Australia men’s national association football team has been closed as no-consensus.  Yes, a proud day for Wikipedia.  The closing admin felt the arguments about neutrality, verifiability, precision in name, undue weight were equally as compelling as the arguments about how a Wikiproject should control the decision to rename the article as opposed to allowing local consensus, and because the men’s game is inherently superior to the women’s game.

 

Worse yet, Wikipedia appears to enshrine male bullying as the acceptable way of enforcing systemic bias in favour of men.  They appear to think they are on YouTube in the comments section, as opposed to working collaboratively building an encyclopedia.  Don’t like what a person says?  Use vulgarity.  Want to dismiss their opinion? Accuse them of hysteria.  When they point out how you’re wrong and you’ve got no leg to stand on, accuse them of drug use.  The association football project should be proud to call Lukeno94 one of their own.

And I’ll repeat: The Wikimedia Foundation wonders why they have a problem with women?

Systemic bias against sportswomen on English Wikipedia

 For me, Wikinews and Wikipedia and Commons are all three interlinked, complementary projects… so I am going to divert for a moment to talk about systematic bias against sportswomen on English Wikipedia.  There is a huge amount of talk about female scientists, artists and more.  Sportswomen are often left out of the conversation.  Sports needs attention, now more than ever.

FIFA rules say that national teams are segregated by gender, with a men’s team and a women’s team.  FIFA pages list men and women’s team on pages about the national football federation.  Thus, we have the backdrop for a rename article request for the Australian national soccer team.  The article title is not gendered, and the article is exclusively about the men’s team despite the fact that Australia has a women’s team, the Matildas, who are ranked higher than the men’s team, the Socceroos, could probably dream of.  The women are currently ranked 8th.  The men? 59th.  The women’s team competed at the first World Cup for women. The Australian men? Not so much.  While the Australian women missed the first FIFA organized World Cup, the Matildas have not missed one since then.  The Australian men? Not so much.

The lack of men in the article name about the Socceroos is a form of systematic bias against women in sports.  It implies that Australia has only one national soccer team, a team made entirely of men.  This is patently untrue.  It violates Wikipedia’s policies regarding factual verifiability.  Furthermore, it violates Wikipedia’s policies regarding neutrality by suggesting one team is inherently more important than another: The men matter more and the women’s game should be ghettoized. This sort of systematic discrimination continues on Wikipedia against many other national teams where national teams are segregated by gender by rule.  Despite acknowledging the rules for these sports, FIFA, the Australian Sports Commission, Football Federation Australia, the Australian Broadcasting Corportation, the Socceroos facebook page, SBS, and other media organizations and sport organizations that recognise the co-equal nature of Australia having two national teams, not one, there is pushback from a cohort around Wikiproject Association Football.  Why? Because properly naming the article in compliance with [[WP:PRECISE]], a guideline saying article titles should be precise, and in compliance with [[WP:V]] that says things need to be verifiable and [[WP:NPOV]] that says Wikipedia should be neutral… well, by properly naming these articles, it would imply the women’s game was equivalent to the men’s game.  Worse yet, by moving the Australian article, every non-gendered men’s national team article across all sports would need to be renamed and you just cannot force that by renaming one article.  Policy be damned.  Mustn’t let men’s game be demeaned by suggesting Australia has two senior national teams recognised by FIFA, FFA and the AOC representing the country internationally.

And then people wonder why women would want to contribute to English Wikipedia?  (I still remember the time I was accused by one editor of introducing systematic bias into English Wikipedia by taking too many articles about Australian sportswomen to DYK because it was unfair to men.) This issue needs attention.